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Vaccine Safety

The Division of Immunization Services considers vaccine safety a priority for all West Virginia residents.  The goal is to provide health care providers, parents, students, and adults with a complete resource center regarding vaccine safety. 

Monitoring health problems after vaccination is essential to ensure the United States continues to have the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. CDC's Immunization Safety Office identifies possible vaccine side effects and conducts studies to determine whether a health problem is caused by a specific vaccine.

Vaccines are held to the highest standard of safety. The United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine can be licensed. Once in use, vaccines are continually monitored for safety and efficacy.

Are you a parent?

If so, CDC has a great resource center just for you. Click here to visit the "What Parents Need to Know."

Click on the vaccine to learn more about each shot:

Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Acellular Pertussis (DTaP);   Haemophilus Influenzae Type B (Hib);   Human Papillomavirus (HPV);   Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR);    Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella (MMRV);    Rotavirus Vaccine


Common Concerns / Vaccine Safety Concerns

Myths and misinformation about vaccine safety can confuse parents who are trying to make sound decisions about their children's health care.

Vaccination is a common, memorable event, and association of events in time often signals cause and effect. While some of the sickness or reactions that follow vaccination may be caused by the vaccine, many are unrelated events that occur by coincidence after vaccination. Therefore, the scientific research that attempts to distinguish true vaccine adverse events from unrelated, chance occurrence is important.

Adjuvants
Autism
Fainting (Syncope)
Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
Thimerosal

Monitoring health problems after vaccination is essential to ensure vaccines are held to the highest standard of safety. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine can be licensed. Once licensed and in use, vaccines are continuously monitored for safety and efficacy.

Vaccine Safety Monitoring Activities

Why are vaccines monitored for safety?  The most important reason is to detect rare reactions. Although vaccines are tested extensively before they are licensed for use in the United States, not enough people are included in the tests to detect reactions that happen only rarely. If serious reactions are found when the vaccine is in widespread use, the vaccine may be withdrawn. Higher Risk Groups. Vaccine safety monitoring also makes sure new vaccines are safe for groups such as the elderly, those with chronic medical conditions, and pregnant women. Vaccine trials may deliberately exclude members of these groups. Public Confidence in Vaccines. Monitoring vaccine safety also helps to maintain public confidence needed to keep enough people vaccinated to prevent disease outbreaks.  Click here to learn how we know vaccines are safe.



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