Agency Header

Osteoporosis Risk Factors

depressed man.jpg​Risk factors you cannot change:
            • Gender. Your chances of developing osteoporosis are greater if you are a woman. Women have less bone tissue and lose bone faster than men because of the changes that happen with menopause.
            • Age. The older you are, the greater your risk of osteoporosis. Your bones become thinner and weaker as you age.
            • Body size. Small, thin-boned women are at greater risk.
            • Ethnicity. Caucasian and Asian women are at highest risk. African American and Hispanic women have a lower but significant risk.
            • Family history. Fracture risk may be due, in part, to heredity. People whose parents have a history of fractures also seem to have reduced bone mass and may be at risk for fractures.
Tied Cigarette.jpg​Risk factors you can change:
            • Sex hormones. Abnormal absence of menstrual periods (amenorrhea), low estrogen level (menopause), and low testosterone level in men can bring on osteoporosis.
            • Anorexia nervosa. Characterized by an irrational fear of weight gain, this eating disorder increases your risk for osteoporosis.
            • Calcium and vitamin D intake. A lifetime diet low in calcium and vitamin D makes you more prone to bone loss.
            • Medication use. Long-term use of certain medications, such as glucocorticoids and some anticonvulsants can lead to loss of bone density and fractures.
            • Lifestyle. An inactive lifestyle or extended bed rest tends to weaken bones.
            • Cigarette smoking. Smoking is bad for bones as well as the heart and lungs.
            • Alcohol intake. Excessive consumption of alcohol increases the risk of bone loss and fractures

 

Health Promotion and Chronic Disease
350 Capitol Street, Room 514  Charleston, WV 25301-3715
Ph: (304) 356-4193 Fx: (304) 558-1553

Privacy, Security and Accessibility | WV.gov | USA.gov | © 2017 State of West Virginia