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Study Shows Measles, Mumps and Rubella Vaccines Not Associated With Autism

7/1/2014

Time
By Melissa Hellmann
July 1, 2014

Although vaccines have eliminated many communicable diseases, some parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children in recent years

A new study on childhood vaccines analyzed 20,000 reports published from 2010 to 2013 and determined that immunizations do not lead to autism — a finding that researchers hope will dissipate fears propagated by antivaccine campaigners such as Hollywood stars Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey.

Researchers in the study referenced 67 scientific papers out of the 20,000, which were chosen for their control and comparison groups and relevance, to expose the low-risk factors of vaccinations.

“Without this work there would be a lack of transparency around this issue, so by doing this important research in a thorough and systematic way, we acknowledge that there are rare but actual side effects,” said co-author Margaret Maglione, a policy analyst at RAND Corp.

The study published in the peer-reviewed journal Pediatrics concluded there is no link between vaccines and leukemia or food allergies. Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) were found to occasionally have the severe side effects of fever or seizures; although, crucially, the report concludes that the “MMR vaccine is not associated with autism.”

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